Waiting for “coolest pair” in Formula One

Rumor attraction of Red Bull withdraw from Lotus Kimi Raikkonen continues to grow. The Iceman combination with Sebastian Vettel assessed will be very cool for the world racing pole.

Raikkonen comeback this season acted pretty incredible. Despite a long absence, the Finnish driver is able to penetrate the top three standings F1 Vettel and become a competitor as well as his former team, Ferrari.

It made Raikkonen into one of three candidates who will replace Mark Webber, who decided to retire at the end of the season. Kimi stay competitive with Toro Tosso duo, Daniel Ricciardo and Jean-Eric Vergne.

However, McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton-Raikkonen Vettel assess the combination is the most interesting. Because, Raikkonen could be assessed a new rival for the defending champion.

“Today will be a very cool look at Kimi in Red Bull. He would complicate Seb (Vettel),” said Hamilton in the British newspaper, The Sun.

“Kimi is a superb rider, everyone knows it. So it will be very interesting what he would do with a better car,” added the champion of the 2008 F1 season.

Lotus Party is still reluctant to release their hero is. Raikkonen himself insists there is no agreement whatsoever on the future. “If I know (about the future) will definitely be my responsibility to stop these nonsense rumors,” said Kimi.

Raikkonen started his career in 2001 with Sauber defending. After that, he moved to McLaren a year later before solidifying Ferrari in 2007.

33-year-old man had quit F1 in 2009 and performed at the rally event World Rally Championship (WRC) and Nascar. In 2012, the 2007 F1 champion eventually back to racing pole.

Austin Dillon wins at Eldora in first NASCAR dirt race in 43 years

The Camping World Truck Series’ debut on dirt went from novelty to mainstay in the span of three hours Wednesday night at Eldora Speedway, as Austin Dillon scored the first NASCAR national series win on a dirt track in 43 years.

If you watched and weren’t entertained, I don’t know what to tell you.

“This is real racing right here, this is all I’ve got to say,” Dillon said in victory lane after beating Kyle Larson to the finish line in a green-white-checker sprint.

The thing is, that wasn’t just the joy in Dillon coming out after he reached victory lane. The excitement of being at Tony Stewart’s track was palpable and authentic. Drivers and team members exclaimed throughout the evening about the race, and heck, not even a discouraging word was said by the NASCAR social media chamber, a notoriously finicky segment.

A big reason for that excitement? The racing.

Yes, it was different. But it wasn’t just the difference in styles in how a driver attacks a half-mile dirt track versus a 1.5 mile asphalt track that made Wednesday night mesmerizing. It was multiple grooves, the throttle management and a genuine sense that the race was ultimately going to be decided by the drivers and their trucks, not by clean air. (Which can be a bit of an oxymoron at a dirt track anyway.) Throw in a big helping of nostalgia — many NASCAR drivers grew up racing local dirt tracks — and it’s hard not to consider the night a rousing success.

Need proof of how that all came together? Look no further than the battle between Norm Benningand Clay Greenfield in the Last Chance Qualifier race to get into the 150 lap main event. Instead of relying only on single truck qualifying to set the field for the race, NASCAR used heat races and a subsequent last-chance race to whittle the 35 trucks attempting the race to the 30 trucks that would start the race.

With two laps left in the Last Chance race, Benning was holding onto the final transfer spot into the main race in fifth place. Greenfield was right behind him, both drivers in trucks they own and prepare themselves, a far cry from the multi-million dollar operations in the Sprint Cup Series.

Greenfield leaned on Benning’s bumper as the two approached the white flag. Benning got loose, but stayed in the throttle and held the position. As they came through turns three and four again,Greenfield got to the inside of Benning and slid up into him, forcing Benning’s truck into the wall. Sparks flew, but Benning stayed in the gas once again, nipping Greenfield at the line for that last place starting position.

And when Benning got back to the garage? Members from seemingly every team were waiting for him to get out of his truck to congratulate him.

Did NASCAR take a gamble by staging a type of race not run for nearly half a century at an 18,000 seat facility owned by a Sprint Cup Series champion? Probably. Did it pay off? Absolutely. Instead of the question being “Does the Truck Series return next year?” it’s now “When can the Nationwide and Cup Series do this?”

So the champion at Wimbledon, Murray praised coach

London – The success of Andy Murray a champion at Wimbledon in 2013 also could not be separated from the role of coach, Ivan Lendl. Murray did not hesitate to give praise for his coach.

Murray came out as the champion at Wimbledon after defeating Novak Djokovic in the final round on Sunday (07/07/2013) night local time, with a score of 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. The win makes Murray the first British man to win Wimbledon after Fred Perry did 77 years ago.

Murray has become a more consistent player since handled by Lendl in the early 2012. After being trained by a guy who has eight grand slam titles – except Wimbledon – it is, Murray won several prestigious titles such as the 2012 Olympic gold medal, the U.S. Open in 2012, and now Wimbledon 2013.

“He believed me when a lot of people do not. He remained with me through some heavy defeats in recent years. He was very patient with me,” said Murray was quoted as saying by Reuters.

“I’m glad I managed to do this for him. He would love to win here, but I think this is the best thing for him,” added the 26-year-old tennis player.

Murray specifically mentions that his coach had a major role in polishing mentality. He said that Lendl makes it a lot to learn from previous defeats.

“He has made ​​me learn more than I can defeat more than ever. He always tells me what he thinks. And in tennis, is not always easy to do that in the relationship of players and coaches,” said Murray.

“He makes me a little different mentality in the face of matches like this,” said the world number two world ranking was added.

Will Kobe Bryant look out for Lakers?

This week, with the release of the official salary cap numbers and onset of formal contract signings, was supposed to bring clarity to the NBA. Instead it left us debating the kind of obligations not covered by the collective bargaining agreement, a hazy realm of morals and values.

You could gather as many lawyers and accountants as you want and you still couldn’t come up with a definitive answer to the question: What do the Lakers owe Kobe Bryant? Conversely, how much does he owe them?

These are the central questions governing the Lakers as they make their key decisions for the next few years. Should they go all-out for another championship in Kobe’s shrinking window among the league’s elite, or should they embark on a long-term strategy to win down the road? Should Kobe forsake the fair compensation coming his way in order to facilitate the Lakers’ moves?

The Lakers have paid Bryant a quarter of a billion dollars during his NBA career. They’ve put him in position to win five championships. In return he has played through every circumstance short of being strapped to a hospital gurney, and has scored more points than all but three players in the history of the league.

So far it appears the Lakers are operating under the premise that they’re beholden to Bryant, the guy they’ve been tied to since 1996. It’s not the way things usually work in Los Angeles, where spouses and leased cars are often returned at a similar rate. The Lakers used their one-time amnesty provision on Metta World Peace‘s $7.7 million salary, even though taking Bryant’s $30 million off the books would have had a more dramatic financial impact and still provided an opportunity for him to return in 2014-15.

A promise to cut Kobe loose (along with axing Mike D’Antoni) also would have been a much more meaningful sign to Dwight Howard than those “Stay” billboards that the Lakers were committed to the center.

Dramatic moves? Surely. But if you think about it, they would have been no different from what the Lakers did in 2004 when they were desperate to retain Kobe. They let Phil Jackson go and traded Shaquille O’Neal to Miami. When it came to choosing between Kobe and Shaq, the Lakers went with the 25-year-old over the 32-year-old. They also went with the more popular of the two. Lakers fans were infatuated with Kobe, and growing increasingly frustrated with Shaq.

Kobe won the crowd. And if there were any doubts that he still holds exalted status, he quelled those when he made his way out to the Lakers bench on crutches, shortly after Howard was ejected from the Lakers’ final playoff game. The crowd responded with its loudest cheer of the day.

It’s why the Lakers are riding with Bryant, who turns 35 next month and is coming off a major injury, over the 27-year-old Howard, who sent neither the franchise nor its fan base into mourning when he decided to leave for Houston. It’s also because Howard built no equity with the Lakers. He didn’t win a single playoff game.

Accomplishments don’t always mean obligations. Paul Pierce played 1,102 games for theBoston Celtics, helped them hang their 17th championship banner, scored more points in the green and white jersey than anyone other than John Havlicek — and yet those things didn’t allow

Sebastian Coe wants four-year ban for failed drugs tests

Sebastian Coe

“We have to go back from two years to four years. The move down to two did a lot of damage to my sport,” Lord Coe told BBC Radio 5 live’s Sportsweek.

“It is for the clean athletes. I don’t care about the cheats we weed out. These people are trashing my sport.”

While the 1500m gold medallist from Moscow 1980 and Los Angeles 1984 does not believe trust in the sport has completely evaporated, Lord Coe is concerned people are losing faith in athletics.

“It is depressing. Trust sits at the heart of this,” said Lord Coe, who is also vice-president of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

“I don’t think trust is gone entirely, but it was a bad day for the sport. The big challenge here is to go on fighting, this is not a fight we can afford to lose.

“It is about trust. If fans can’t trust the athletes and go there knowing what they are watching is questionable, then we will descend to American wrestling where most of the crowd know it is fake and, worryingly, don’t care.”

Lord Coe believes that athletes are currently taking risks by cheating as the two-year ban does not take enough time out of their career to be a deterrent.

But the London 2012 organiser and current British Olympic Association chairman knows that lifetime bans are not possible.

The BOA, before Coe was elected chairman, had a policy of banning any British athletes from competing in Olympic Games for life if they had previously failed a drugs test.

 

However, in April 2012 the governing bodylost its battle with the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) to keep the policy.

It allowed athletes such as Dwain Chambers, who failed a drugs test in 2003, to compete at London 2012

“If I could bring lifetime bans in I would,” said Lord Coe.

“The legal inhibitor to be able to do that is profound. We are not going to be able to have life bans, they would be challenged and when we have done it we have lost.

“Four years does make people think, it is a big chunk of your career but two years with appeals is often only 18 months. Too many athletes have been prepared to take the risk.”

Rossi Break Alex Barros Record in Assen

Valentino Rossi apparently reached a new record after winning the MotoGP Netherlands, on June 29, 2013. The Doctor became the oldest active riders capable of winning the Grand Prix series of primary classes.

After more than two years of famine victory in MotoGP, Rossi ultimately successful victory in MotoGP 2013. Success in Circuit Assen is a 80th victory of the Italian racer in the primary classroom Grand Prix (500cc and MotoGP).

However, the official website launch MotoGP, Rossi has also created a new record in the Grand Prix event. The Yamaha rider became the oldest active rider capable of winning the Grand Prix series of primary classes. Rossi beat the record of former Brazilian driver, Alex Barros.

Rossi’s first win in the primary classroom occurred in British 500cc race, at the Donington Park Circuit, United Kingdom, July 9, 2000. 34-year-old rider wins at Assen occurred 12 years and 355 days later.

The previous record was held by Barros, with 11 years and 204 days. Barros won the first victory in the 500cc class Circuit Jarama (Spain), 26 September 1993, and last in MotoGP Portugal, 17 April 2005. Third place went to Phil Read with 11 years and 16 days.

Rossi chance to break the record in all classes belong to Loris Capirossi. If starting from the first 125cc win in the series, August 18, 1996 (Czech Republic), Rossi was 16 years and 345 days. While the record belongs Capirossi was 17 years and 49 days.

MotoGP 2013 will continue this weekend at Sachsenring, Germany. Rossi is currently still ranked five of the standings with a score of 85 points.

Sprinter Usain Bolt Will Eventually Strengthen Manchester United

The world’s fastest runner, Usain Bolt can soon fulfill his dream to strengthen England’s elite clubs, Manchester United.

Bolt, 26-year-old Jamaican, aspires to join United, but has never reached expectations. He could only watch as the stars of United’s play.

Well, in August, Bolt could use costumes United at Old Trafford Stadium, while United face test against Sevilla party.

“My presence will be different at United, I can run fast and play ball,” said Bolt.

When United’s Alex Ferguson handled, Bolt can never permit. Now with the move to coach David Moyes, Rio Ferdinand as a close friend and eventually persuaded Bolt Bolt’ll play with costumes United on 9 August.